What is Graphix4change?

Let’s start with what it is NOT:
• Graphix4change is not a militant organization.
•  It is not a corporate entity, nor is it a non-profit organization. 
•  It is not even a grass-roots web movement.

It is simply the personal website of an opinionated graphic designer and design instructor… me. It is my soapbox to rant, my wallboard to post signs on, my connection to the great experiment called Democracy in America and to a larger extent the experiment of a democratic World Wide Web.

I have never sold advertising on the site, nor is the work funded by anyone other than myself. From time to time I get hired to create works for others (campaign literature, posters, etc.), or even sell images I’ve created privately, but in general I have used the site to post my personal work and made it available worldwide, for free.

Why would I do this? Not because I’m independently wealthy, but as a designer, most of the work I do is for hire for someone else’s message or product, and I wanted a venue to express my own political views that no one seemed to want to pay me for. And since political art only seems to ever find an audience in the art world every four years or so, posting images on-line allows for a 24/7/365 virtual exhibit without needing a physical venue.

I have the great fortune of having viewers, fans and detractors from countries all over the world, something I never could have achieved through my client work alone or by exhibiting solely in Chelsea.

So if you’ve made it through this far, thank you for taking the time to visit my little self-important site. Feel free to download images, contact me with comments and suggestions. And if you are looking to hire a smart-assed designer for your progressive cause, I’d be happy to be paid for what I do.

Enjoy,
Mike
Creator of www.graphix4change.com

Current

Arab-Comedt Teaser PosterArab-Comedy 10 Year Show

Over the past several years I have had the pleasure of working with the NY Arab-American Comedy Festival, and this year marks their 10th Anniversary Show. This group of comedians, actors, poets and instigators began their quest at a time when proclaiming one’s Arabic ancestry was decidedly not popular, and most certainly not equated with the term “funny”.  Today, many of these performers have taken on Hollywood, Indie films, cable news and prime time television! So for the Tenth Anniversary Show I decided that one poster would not due, better make TWO.

Special Editorial Cartoon

Syria-Jenga

(click image to enlarge)

Like most of the American people, I have a hard time accepting military intelligence sources when it comes to bombing another country — call it a little jaded feeling over yellowcake uranium, “mushroom cloud” and “slam-dunk” from 2001. So when the Secretary of State whom I voted for President, and the current President whom I voted for twice, come out and say “we know for certain” that Syria’s President Assad used chemical weapons on his own people, I’m still more than a bit uncomfortable with the idea. Oh yea, and that report that the CIA officially helped Iraq use chemical weapons back when it was fighting Iran doesn’t help much either.

Putting aside the whole “world’s policemen” stuff, just what will a “limited narrow strike” actually accomplish, other than to allow the U.S. and President Obama to save a little face? And really, why on earth would Assad use chemical weapons when we already stated that it would be “crossing a red line”, knowing full well that it would invite U.S. involvement? Now, the rebels, whom are largely foreign and militant, they would be quite happy to see the U.S. come in, remove Assad, and allow them to step into power, so they really have the motive. Now, I don’t completely remove the option that Assad used nerve gas (won’t be the first time the world witnessed an Arab leader arrogantly defying the West), but my point is Assad was the only thing that held Syria together as a country of many factions, religions and cultures. Once he is gone, Western-style democracy will not be the thing that takes his place. Perhaps we need to remember the first time we were in Afghanistan…